Friday, 3 May 2013

HOURIA BOUTELDJA's TALK IN LONDON & THE FAILURES OF 'DECOLONISATION' ACTIVISTS

[My comments to sister Houria and her replies at 44:45 and 1:20:45]



On sister Houria Boutelja's talk in London
Failure to take a position against Nato and the lynching of our people is not decolonisation

This event took place last saturday at the IHRC bookshop. I have heard sister Houria Bouteldja's name  for some years, and have met one of her comrades, brother Bader Lejmi whose Homeland is Tunisia, from her organisation the Indigenous of the Republic. I have quite a few discussions with brother Bader on the recent few years developments in the Middle East and North African ('MENA') regions, and we disagree on basic analysis on the Arab sting: Bader considers it a liberation movement, I consider it a recolonisation operation.

So I was looking forward to hearing sister Houria speak (her Homeland is Algeria), and beforehand I had a look through her organisations facebook page and website looking for what their position was on the mass lynching and persecution, kidnapping and torture of thousands upon thousands of Black people, anti-nato fighters and innocents in Libya. There was not one comment on this, which was rather surprising as I assumed sister Houria and brother Bader's organisation was not just comprised of blind supporters of the Arab sting, but also included Black Africa brothers and sisters who would be more critical minded about these issues.

The event itself with sister Houria was a good chance to have a face to face critical reasoning as to the issues impacting our peoples who are struggling to overcome the white power structure and how our struggles related to the fundamental power of our communities which is the power of our Homelands in their united GlobalSouth struggle in struggling against and defeating white imperialism. I pressed sister Houria to give analysis as how our GlobalSouth Homelands relates to our struggles in the 'west', and challenged her to take a more critical position from the point of view of anti-imperialist internationalism

Sister Houria did not develop any analysis on either of these regards. Readers can see and hear her agree on some level with on my comments at the event, but gave said nothing about how our struggle interrelates to the struggles of our peoples, and also gave some rather tenous reasons why she has failed to, and her organisation has failed to give any comment to the six month bombing of Libya, the imperialist operation against Syria and the related traumas and disasters that have befallen them and have befallen the people of Tunisia and Egypt.

Brother Mustafa Ali from the Bandung2 movement also made some interesting interventions in terms of exploring conceptual frameworks of de-constructing white supremacy in the interests of the liberation of our peoples.

I was very dissapointed that sister Houria, whose political positions are compared sometimes to that of Malcolm X, failed to give any real solid position on the nato operations on Libya and Syria, but rather said that we will have to wait for 30 years before making a clear position on these events. People who have gone along with the nato Arab spring clean are making all kinds of contorted somersaults to try and cover the obvious counterrevolutionary uncle tom operation which the Arab sting is. Similarly sister Houria seemed to be coming out with some rather 'out there' explanations as to the abysmal failures of her and her leadership of the movement as to why they have capitulated in the face of world historic crimes of white imperialism. One can only hope that others use these contortions to understand more clearly the reality of what traumas and disasters has been visiting our people in the MENA region.

One wonders what the more anti-imperialist minded people of her movement are thinking about all of this, and wonders what the other darker skinned African members and others from other regions of the GlobalSouth think about being associated with a movement that fails to take even a half decent position on some of the most important issues impacting our peoples in the GlobalSouth. So far, I have heard nothing from anyone in that movement who might take issue with these problematics in the spirit of courage and honesty for our peoples liberation.

Sukant Chandan
Sons of Malcolm

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